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South Korea to export nuclear reactor technology in Jordan

South Korea to export nuclear reactor technology in Jordan

Yonhap in Seoul on March 30 Xinhua
South Korea will be the first export of technology to build nuclear power to use their own equipment, and has officially signed a contract with Jordan.
Korea Ministry of Education and Science and Technology 30, said South Korea the same day in the Jordanian capital Amman and Jordan signed a research and education in Jordan with the construction of nuclear reactors (JRTR) contract.

Thus, Jordan's first nuclear reactor is expected to ensure that South Korea is also the first time in 50 years nuclear energy R & D to overseas exports of nuclear equipment. Therefore, the contract between the two countries opened a new chapter in the history of nuclear energy.

Under the contract, the Commonwealth of Korean companies in Jordan 2015 will be at the University of Science and Technology (JUST) campus building research reactors, with the isotope production facilities, administration building and so on.

By the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and Korean companies Daewoo construction consortium formed to conduct site investigation and preparatory work is planned to commence in June and was initially completed in July 2014. Later, after the pilot operation is planned in February 2015 to formally complete the construction project.
In addition, the ROK will also Jordan training management, research personnel. JRTR these people will be responsible for the operation and maintenance, radiation safety management, and production tasks with digital elements.
By signing this contract, with South Korea's research reactor technology has been recognized by the world, and developed into a major supplier of nuclear reactors, provide a favorable opportunity.

U.S. think tank said: Pentagon blocked high-tech weapons and equipment R & D

2009-11-17 09:25:41FalseTag:

U.S. think tank said: Pentagon blocked high-tech weapons and equipment R & D

The Pentagon's new industrial policy director, Brett Lambert,
intends to recast the relationship between the Defense Dept. and
industry to gain a better understanding of contractors and
suppliers at all levels.
Meanwhile, defense officials are complaining about the quality
of work from contractors just as the Pentagon is trying to revive a
dormant dialogue with top CEOs over how to sustain the US
industrial base.
This leaves contractors in the position of receiving public
blows from their defense customer (sometimes affecting their stock
price) while at the same time asking the Pentagon for more support
for their specialized skilled workers and facilities.
Senior government officials, including Defense Secretary Robert
Gates, say they are concerned about industry's performance (see p.
26). This includes poor quality of parts delivered, problems in
hardware or software discovered during testing, and meeting
projected schedules and costs.
It is unclear whether this performance problem is a symptom of a
larger deficiency in the industrial base, which has atrophied in
some areas since the Cold War. "I don't know if you can demonstrate
a connection, "says David Berteau, senior adviser at the Center for
Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). But to repair these
problems, there will have to be a close linkage between acquisition
reform and industrial-base policy initiatives, he notes.
However, some of the problems in major weapon programs,
including the Ground-based Interceptor (GBI) and several space
programs, occurred because of deficiencies in parts delivered to
prime contractors. This puts the entire supply chain squarely in
Lambert's focus.
Lambert says he wants more "insight, not oversight," of the
entire supply chain, including visibility into second-and
third-tier suppliers. Oftentimes, they have only a six-month
backlog, making them more volatile than the primes, which typically
have about 2-3 years' worth of work.
Lambert provided an example of a prime contractor, which he
declined to name, that typically receives about $ 5 billion in
defense contracts annually. At least $ 2 billion of that goes
directly to subcontractors. But, Lambert says he lacks knowledge of
the inner workings of these companies, including their quality
control and financial stability.
Air Force Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Henry (Trey) Obering, former Missile
Defense Agency (MDA) director, says the second-and third-tier
suppliers were a major focus area for him while in office from
2004-08. "The biggest area [of concern] wasn't the prime. It was
suppliers being managed by the primes. "When he began his work at
the agency, Obering says he met with prime contractor CEOs once a
quarter, and with each individually once a year. But he later
expanded this to include second-and third-tier supplier CEOs. "You
have to understand what is going on in your own backyard, "he
notes.
As for Lambert, he is puzzled about why top Pentagon officials
had stopped regular meetings with industry CEOs. However, this
dialogue is being revived. Defense Secretary Robert Gates met with
15 industry CEOs last month.
Although some of the quality problems for the Pentagon occur at the
subcontractor level, the primes are ultimately responsible under
many contracts for the performance of those suppliers. Obering says
he would use incentives and award fees to indicate clearly when a
prime and its suppliers were not up to snuff.
Through acquisition reform, the Pentagon can address how to
motivate industry to perform well on specific programs. And the
Defense Dept. Could also consider how to reform the Pentagon's
behavior on matters such as requirements discipline and fitful
funding. Sometimes, the government is quick to point out problems
with contractor performance, but often these issues are the product
of a "mutual complicity" by both the government and industry
regarding overly ambitious goals and "anemic funding" when
embarking on a program, says Berteau.
However, sometimes there is no mutual acceptance of the blame
when shifts in a program are requested by the Defense Dept.,
triggering delays or cost overruns. During a study last year, CSIS
found that the government made major changes to the Littoral Combat
Ship and the Marine One presidential helicopter replacement
programs that were instrumental in industry's inability to execute
them as desired, says Berteau.
A close link is also needed between acquisition reform
initiatives and industrial strategy and policy, says Jeff Bialos, a
partner at Sutherland Asbill
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Brennan and a former deputy undersecretary of Defense for
industrial affairs.
The Pentagon is legally required to consider the ability of the
industrial base to accomplish specific tasks in a program at each
of its milestones, says Berteau. But there is no requirement to
explore whether the industrial base is able to support the breadth
of work planned by the Pentagon in the long term. So the net result
is a seemingly fitful policy that is not tied to overall defense
and economic goals.
"For every dollar we spend on programs and platforms we no
longer require to address the threat, those are resources we are
taking away from innovation and technology, "says Lambert." What we
need to do as a department is to better communicate to both
industry and Capitol Hill where it is we are headed and what types
of investment we need to make in manufacturing and in
technologies. "
Yet, Lambert's team is low on resources. As the Pentagon gutted
its acquisition workforce in the 1990s, the industrial policy
office also lost skilled analysts.
Although the office is often overwhelmed with "day-to-day"
tasks, Lambert is trying to transform its focus to take on a
long-range, strategic view of the industrial base. "The office of
industrial policy should be thinking ahead, "he says. 'We should
not be thinking about solving yesterday's mistakes, but trying to
address tomorrow's problems. "
A set of criteria is needed to outline when "intervention" is
needed by the Pentagon for a particular industrial sector, says
Bill Greenwalt, former deputy undersecretary of Defense for
industrial policy. After cutting off funding for the bomber
industry last year, contractors argued that money was needed to
keep highly skilled design teams in place. In the Fiscal 2011
spending request, $ 200 million was set aside for those teams at
Boeing / Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman, signaling that the
Pentagon is willing to listen.
Another area needing immediate attention is the rocket-motor
industrial base, which was dealt a blow by the cutback of GBIs and
slashing of NASA's Constellation human spaceflight program.
Lambert's office is preparing a report, to be delivered to Congress
in June, on how to sustain this part of industry. This includes
specialized facilities and workers who are familiar with the
dangerous tasks of building solid-rocket motors and crafting the
liquid-fueled engines (mainly the RS-68 for use by the Delta IV
launch vehicle).
While orders for large Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles
(EELVs) from the Air Force have been reduced owing to delayed
satellite programs, the Constellation termination cuts even further
the demand for specialized work for the RS-68. The NASA move
"Changes everything. This is a game changer," Lambert says. "We
[The Pentagon] share an industrial base with NASA-on solids,
liquids, range infrastructure and a workforce, "he notes." So, with
the cancellation of the Constellation program... we have got a
lot of work to do with NASA to figure out how to maintain a minimum
industrial base on liquid rocket engines and solid rocket
motors. "
Gary Payton, deputy undersecretary of the Air Force for space,
says that even before the Constellation termination, the per-unit
price of Atlas V and Delta IV EELVs had been creeping
upward-largely due to the rising cost of "piece parts" such as
nozzles and avionics provided by second-and third-tier suppliers.
Even with the savings produced by the United Launch Alliance joint
venture (formed by Lockheed Martin and Boeing in 2006) to reduce
overhead and manage two vehicle families, the overall pricing trend
is going up. "The cost savings of combining the two companies into
one are there, but it is being swamped by an increase in the cost
of the piece-parts, "Payton says.
This trend is not unique to space systems; keeping a steady
supply chain is essential in program stability across
aerospace.
Payton says the industrial base supporting his satellite
programs-which have been troubled by fitful funding, poor quality
of parts and mismanagement by the government and contractors-is
improving. But, the pace is slow.

Original Address: http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_channel.jsp?channel=defense&id=news/awst/2010/02/22/AW_02_22_2010_p24-205159.xml&headline=Pentagon% 20Explores% 20Supplier % 20Problems

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Exclusive: China's ambitious space program to disclose the details of

2009-11-16 09:25:41FalseTag:

? Exclusive: China's ambitious space program to disclose the details of

In

China's manned space program's goal is to surpass the United States, as early as 2016 the use of advanced on-orbit spacecraft and fuel supply system, which will take U.S. astronauts may have to rely on Russian spacecraft.

China Manned Space Engineering Office, Wang Bao Wednesday in an interview, revealed China's ambitious space program of the new details.

Reuters

From left, ready to implement the task of Chinese astronauts Jing Haipeng, Zhai Zhigang and Liu Boming, photo taken in 2008.

In less than 20 years, China has no space program from a country seeking to grow into a world in space leading countries. China plans by a university, government research institutions and manufacturers an extensive network to realize their growing space ambitions.

With the unwavering support of the government, and more than 100 domestic agencies into manned space program, China seems committed to achieving the independent exploration of outer space, perhaps as early as the end of this decade can be achieved. China is to launch a spacecraft into space, so that they can be assembled into a large in-orbit spacecraft. This is a more in-depth exploration of the solar system the only way.

A few months later the U.S. space shuttle will be retired, even under the most optimistic expectations, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) the next few years will have to rely on Russia to send U.S. astronauts to the International Space Station. U.S. officials responsible for space projects have said they at least until 2015 before deciding on a new generation of high-thrust rocket design.

Obama has hinted that it hoped to expand international cooperation in manned space flight. NASA's head of padein (Charles
Bolden) said that unless the United States and other countries, otherwise we will not be on Mars, we will not be able to return to the moon.

Wang Po is the first time a Western reporter. He said that before 2016, the Chinese astronauts are expected to achieve in-orbit space between cabin and cargo spacecraft docking. Wang Bao said that this is a prelude to a long-term space station; Once completed long-term space station, astronauts are expected to remain there for about six months.

Wang Bao's padein in Outlook will be expected to visit China when suggesting that Beijing ready to discuss the various forms of cooperation the United States. He said that, given the large space required for the project plan and budget, the need for States to cooperate in the exploration of outer space.

Wang Bao also said that China now that the US-China joint space flight astronauts might. He did not dwell on this topic.

Wang Po is Colorado, at an international space conference, said that the China Manned Space Engineering Office has recently completed the work of selecting a new batch of astronauts, selected seven people, two are women, this is China the first time female astronaut. China is not only the space program as a vivid expression of national pride, but also about these projects in the commercial and national security aspects of great potential.

Through the full use of the central government to develop the capacity of large-scale industrial policy, China's space officials are also preparing to launch a series of ambitious commercial and scientific satellites, and ready to be transported to the moon in the development of the machine Rover.

Commenting on Wang Bao NASA rely on commercial space launch ready to cut costs, we can understand the American space exploration budget in the practical problems encountered. He said that to the cost of space exploration is one affordable way to speed up the issue of international cooperation.

British naval vessels from Spain, the evacuation starts

2009-11-12 09:25:41FalseTag:

British naval vessels from Spain, treat the evacuation starts

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation

British naval vessels from Spain to start the evacuation